Trust BCLP

Trust BCLP

Other Posts

Main Content

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Trust Income Tax

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Trust Income Tax

April 16, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

The New York Budget bill made changes not only in the estate tax arena, as previously reported on this blog, but also to the income taxation of certain trusts.

Under law prior to the passage of the Budget bill, a resident trust created by a New Yorker was entirely exempt from New York income tax if there was (i) no New York resident trustee, (ii) no assets located in New York and (iii) no New York source income. The new law, effective for calendar years beginning January 1, 2014, provides that a New York resident beneficiary receiving a distribution of income from a New York State resident trust which is exempt from New York State income tax, will be taxed on that “accumulated distribution”. The new accumulation distribution tax, will not apply if the accumulated income was earned before 2014 or if the trust itself is subject to New

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax

April 8, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

statuteoflibertyAs previously reported on this blog, Governor Cuomo and the New York State legislature, both Assembly and Senate, were busy at work on the budget which contained modifications for the trusts and estates arena. A bill has finally been passed, which looks different from some of the earlier proposals. The new bill impacts the estate and trust world as follows:

Basic Estate Tax Exclusion Amount increases are to be phased in as follows for New York residents or non-residents owning real property located in New York State during the period listed:

 

 

 

  • April 1, 2014 – March 31, 2015 – $2,062,500;
  • April 1, 2015 – March 31, 2016 – $3,125,000;
  • April 1. 2016 – March 31, 2017 – $4,187,500;
  • April 1, 2017 – December 31, 2018 –

Madness in March?

Madness in March?

March 14, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

The term March Madness may take on new significance to New Yorkers this year. In addition to contributing to NCAA pools, New Yorkers should consider making gifts this month. Following up on prior blog post, New Yorkers may have a very small window of opportunity to take advantage of gifting significant sums of money prior to April 1, 2014. Currently New York State has no gift tax. New Yorkers can make gifts of any size to anyone without incurring any New York gift tax consequences at all. However, the gift and estate tax rules may change shortly. Governor Cuomo has proposed a change to New York’s estate and gift tax law that will require all taxable gifts made by a New York resident after March 31, 2014 to be included as part of the gross estate for purposes of calculating the New York estate tax. However, the proposal would

Proposals to Change New York State Transfer Tax System

Proposals to Change New York State Transfer Tax System

January 13, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

There is has been much talk recently about changing the New York State estate and gift tax structure. Currently, New York State estate tax is based on Federal law from 1998.  New York State imposes a state estate tax on estates valued at $1M. Just this week Governor Cuomo proposed increasing the estate tax threshold from the current $1M to $5.25M and lowering the top estate tax rate to 10% over the next four years. His hope would be that beginning in 2019, the New York State estate tax exemption would equal the Federal exemption, which is indexed to inflation.  This plan would ultimately exempt nearly 90% of estates from New York state estate tax and would eliminate any incentive for New Yorkers to move out of state and migrate to states with no estate tax imposed on its residents.

James Gandolfini’s Death Will Bring in Money to IRS and NYS

James Gandolfini’s Death Will Bring in Money to IRS and NYS

July 10, 2013

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

Gandolfini

The terms of James Gandolfini’s December 2012 Last Will and Testament were made public last week when it was filed in New York County Surrogate’s Court. There are a series of specific bequests to his teenage son by his first marriage and some friends and relatives, but the bulk of his probate assets is disposed of as his “residuary estate” and is divided among his sisters, his wife and his baby daughter.

The tax clause of his Will directs that all estate taxes are to be paid from his residuary estate. What does that mean to his beneficiaries? And what does that mean to the IRS and to the NYS Department of Taxation and Finance? Only the 20% of the estate that passes to James Gandolfini’s widow will qualify for the Federal

Transfer Planning with Interests in Private Equity and Hedge Funds

Transfer Planning with Interests in Private Equity and Hedge Funds

July 16, 2012

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

Much has been written about the potentially unique opportunities available to people to make gifts before year-end (for example, see our prior posts here and here). If Congress does not act, the increased $5,120,000 gift tax exemption will decrease dramatically. However, if you are the owner of an interest in a private equity or hedge fund, planning to gift part or all your interest in such fund requires particular care and attention.

Private equity funds are usually created as limited partnerships with two classes of owners. The limited partners are the investors in the fund, while the general partner is typically a business entity created as a limited liability company (“LLC”). A carried interest is normally held in and allocated to the LLC/general partner. A carried interest is the right to receive some of the profits of the fund. The initial value of a carried interest is

Planning for Same-Sex Couples

Planning for Same-Sex Couples

March 22, 2012

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

Same-sex marriage is currently permitted in Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, Washington, D.C. and Washington. The individuals who marry in these states have the ability to enjoy state level rights based on their marital status. Rights granted under state law to married couples who divorce are available to same-sex couples who marry. Examples of such rights include spousal maintenance or alimony and equitable distribution of marital property. Similarly, rights granted under state law to married couples upon the death of one of the parties are also available to same-sex couples who marry. Examples of such rights include rights regarding intestate succession (the distribution of a decedent’s property when he or she dies without leaving a valid Will), the right to receive an elective share (many states require

Methods of Giving

Methods of Giving

November 16, 2011

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

As we approach Thanksgiving and the holiday season many of us turn our thoughts to gift giving to family and loved ones. The Federal gift tax system allows us some opportunities to do such “gifting” in a tax free manner. A few states impose independent state gift taxes, so an expert in your state should be consulted before considering any of these gifting transactions. Each individual has a total of $5,000,000 he can give away during his lifetime before owing any gift tax. However, there are several gifting opportunities which do not count as part of your $5,000,000 lifetime total. It is as if the Federal tax law has deemed them non gifts. Present interest gifts of $13,000 in 2011 and 2012 to any number of recipients are not subject to gift

Lessons from 9/11

Lessons from 9/11

September 1, 2011

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

We are rapidly approaching the tenth anniversary of the September 11th tragedy. There is much to be learned from an estate planning perspective in the aftermath.  

Many of those who perished died without having executed a Last Will and Testament. If you die without a Will, the state in which you are domiciled at the time of your death will determine under the laws of intestacy where the property you held in your own name will pass. It takes many people by surprise, but the list of intestate takers or heirs may not be the people you want to inherit and they might not take in the percentages or shares you would want.

The attorneys of Bryan Cave LLP make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.