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Treasury Green Book Proposal — GRATs and Other Grantor Trusts

The Department of the Treasury has released the Treasury Green Book  for Fiscal Year 2017, which provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning, if passed, is found on page 180 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

MODIFY TRANSFER TAX RULES FOR GRANTOR RETAINED ANNUITY TRUSTS (GRATS) AND OTHER GRANTOR TRUSTS

Current Law

Section 2702 provides that, if an interest in a trust is transferred to a family member, any interest retained by the grantor is valued at zero for purposes of determining the transfer tax value of the gift to the family member(s). This rule does not apply if the retained interest is a “qualified interest.” A fixed annuity, such as the annuity interest retained by the grantor of a GRAT, is one form of qualified

Treasury Green Book Proposal — Consistency in Values

The Department of the Treasury has released the Treasury Green Book  for Fiscal Year 2017, which provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning, if passed, is found on page 179 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

EXPAND REQUIREMENT OF CONSISTENCY IN VALUE FOR TRANSFER AND INCOME TAX PURPOSES

Current Law

Section 1014 provides that the basis of property acquired from a decedent generally is the fair market value of the property on the decedent’s date of death. Similarly, property included in the decedent’s gross estate for estate tax purposes generally must be valued at its fair market value on the date of death. Although the same valuation standard applies to both provisions, until the enactment on July 31, 2015, of the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health

Treasury Green Book Proposal — Reversion to 2009 Laws

The Department of the Treasury has released the Treasury Green Book  for Fiscal Year 2017, which provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning, if passed, is found on page 177 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

RESTORE THE ESTATE, GIFT, AND GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER (GST) TAX PARAMETERS IN EFFECT IN 2009

Current Law

The current estate, GST, and gift tax rate is 40 percent, and each individual has a lifetime exclusion of $5 million for estate and gift tax and $5 million for GST (indexed after 2011 for inflation from 2010). The surviving spouse of a person who dies after December 31, 2010, may be eligible to increase the surviving spouse’s exclusion amount for estate and gift tax purposes by the portion of the predeceased spouse’s exclusion

IRS Postpones Filing Deadline for New Basis Reporting Requirements AGAIN

ThinkstockPhotos-186176261As part of the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015, signed into law by President Obama on July 31, 2015, Sections 1014(f) and 6035 were enacted.

Section 1014(f) provides rules requiring that the basis of certain property acquired from a decedent may not exceed the basis of that property as finally determined for federal estate tax purposes, or, if not finally determined, as reported on a statement made under section 6035.

Section 6035 imposes new reporting requirements  for the executor of an estate of a decedent where a federal estate tax return is required to be filed.  The executor must furnish, to both the IRS and to each person who holds a legal or beneficial interest in the property listed on the estate tax return,  a statement “identifying the

You won the lottery, now what?

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With up to $1.4 Billion at stake in Wednesday’s Powerball, those who play the lottery are busy making plans for what to do with all the money they may win.  If you win it, you won’t ever have to worry about money again – right?

Wrong.

To Do: Year-End Gifting. Check (or not)

With the end of the year approaching, we thought now would be a good time to re-post and update this blog from the end of 2014.

For 2016, the annual exclusion gift amount will remain the same at $14,000 but the lifetime gift tax exemption will increase to $5,450,000 (up from 2015’s $5,430,000).

With fourteen days left in the year, many people are still planning how to make 2015 gifts, whether by making “annual exclusion” gifts of $14,000 per beneficiary, or by taking advantage of the 2015 gift tax exemption amount of $5,430,000.  Whatever the reason for the last-minute gifting, as the end of the year approaches, people may be tempted to make a “quick and easy” gift to their beneficiaries by simply writing a check. As the year draws to a close, however, if your gift is dependent on utilizing 2015 tax law, beware of the potential trap of making a gift

Calling Captain Obvious?

Calling Captain Obvious?

November 5, 2015

Authored by: Kathy Sherby and Stephanie Moll

 

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With some minor exceptions, the facts are the same in PLR 201525002& PLR 201525003. In these PLRs, the Grantor transferred funds to an irrevocable trust for the Grantor’s own benefit and the benefit of several charities. In each case, the trust was created in a state other than the state of residence of the Grantor. In addition to the Trustee, each trust had an Investment Advisor, a Distribution Advisor, a Charity Distribution Advisor and a Trust Protector, none of whom were trust beneficiaries, except that the Charity Distribution Advisor was the Grantor’s spouse who was a potential appointee.

The Distribution Advisor had the power to direct the Trustee as to whether to make Quarterly Distributions, Support Distributions and Special Contingent Distributions to the Grantor, and also had the power to direct the

Let’s Go Over this Again: Remember to Dot Your I’s and Cross Your T’s

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Even though you think you have done everything right, the statute of limitations may not have started to toll if your Form 709, Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, contains errors. Once a properly completed (how much can we stress the words PROPERLY COMPLETED?) Form 709 is filed, the Service must assess the amount of any gift tax within three years of the filing date. Under the Regs, a transfer is adequately disclosed when the return provides the following:

(i) A description of the transferred property and any consideration received by the transferor; [and] … (iv) A detailed description of the method used to determine the fair market value of property transferred, . . . including any financial data . . . utilized in determining the value of the interest.

WHEN IS AN ADOPTION NOT EFFECTIVE TO CHANGE INHERITANCE RIGHTS?

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In Lubin v. AT&T Ret. Sav. Plan (2015 WL 4397703), an adoption was not given effect in determining who would receive the life insurance benefits at issue.

In this case, Austin Hardy participated in a Retirement Savings Plan (“Plan”), which included a life insurance benefit. At his death, he was survived by his sisters, Pauline Lubin and Frances Koryn (Plaintiffs), and his biological daughter, Jennifer Krokey. Although Krokey was Hardy’s biological child, she had been subsequently adopted by a step-father. Under Florida law, a child who is adopted is the child of the adopting parent and ceases to be a child of the biological parent for all purposes.

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