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Updates to Charitable Contribution Procedures

Originally posted on BCLPCharityLaw.com.

Written by Summer Associate, Brandi Miller.

To simplify compliance for grantors and contributors to tax-exempt organizations, the IRS recently issued an updated revenue procedure (Rev. Proc. 2018-32) that combines previously scattered guidance on deductibility and reliance issues. The new revenue procedure explains when grantors and contributors may rely on a listing of an organization on an IRS database of organizations eligible to receive contributions under Sec. 170 for purposes of determining whether the grants or contributions may be deductible under Sec. 170.

Searchable Databases

The IRS maintains and updates two different publicly available databases on organizations eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions under Sec. 170. The first lists organizations that are eligible to receive tax-deductible charitable donations (eligible organization list), and the second is an extract of certain information concerning tax-exempt organizations from the IRS electronic Business Master File (the EOB MF Extract).

Historically, the eligible

A 200% Tax on Self-Dealing? And People Think the Estate Tax is High!

With research and drafting assistance provided by our extern from Washington University School of Law, Rachael Lynch.

Now that we’ve scared you with the potentially high taxes for self-dealing in private foundations, what is self dealing?

Self dealing includes any of the following transactions:

1. sale or exchange, or leasing, of property between a private foundation and a disqualified person (click here for a definition of a disqualified person); 2. lending of money or other extension of credit between a private foundation and a disqualified person; 3. furnishing of goods, services, or facilities between a private foundation and a disqualified person; 4. payment of compensation by a foundation to a disqualified person; 5. transfer of income or assets of a private foundation to a disqualified person; and 6. agreement by a private foundation to make any payment to a government official (other than an agreement to hire the official when

The Effect of Tax Changes On Transfers from IRAs to Charity

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) eliminated all miscellaneous itemized deductions that are subject to the 2% floor, capped state and local taxes deduction at $10,000, and doubled the standard deduction for single persons to $12,000 and married couples to $24,000.  As a result of this triumvirate of changes, the individual taxpayer who is over age 70½ is now faced with new computation to make to determine how best to report deductions on the Form 1040 beginning this year and a new opportunity, if managed correctly, to maximize deductions and minimize taxable income.

 

IRC § 408(d)(8) permits anyone who is over age 70½ to transfer up to $100,000 per year from his/her IRA directly to public charities without reflecting the distribution in taxable income on the taxpayer’s Form 1040.  This technique allows the IRA owner to satisfy the taxpayer’s charitable giving and his/her Required Minimum Distribution

Benefactors Beware: Fake Charities Included in IRS List of Top Tax Scams for 2017

moneybags

Written by Emily Manns and originally posted on BryanCaveCharityLaw.com

Every year, the IRS issues its “Dirty Dozen” Tax Scams list, a compilation of tactics and devices used by scam artists against taxpayers.  While the threat exists year-round, the IRS promulgates the list ahead of filing season. As susceptible taxpayers prepare their returns, they face a higher risk of being targeted.

Charitable Income Tax Deductions: The Rockefeller Edition

rockefeller-center-midtown-west--new-york-city-new-york-usa_mainBillionaire David Rockefeller passed away this week at the age of 101.  According to Forbes magazine, during his lifetime, the well-known philanthropist gave away nearly $2 billion.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

IRS Provides Sample Language for “Qualified Contingency” to Meet “Probability of Exhaustion Test”

One of the many requirements that a trust must meet in order for it to qualify as a Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust (“CRAT”) is the “Probability of Exhaustion Test”.  This test applies to CRATs whose annuity term is based on one or more lifetimes, and requires the likelihood that the charitable remainder beneficiary will not receive its interest in the trust be 5% or less.  If a trust fails the test, then the charitable remainder interest does not qualify for income, gift, or estate tax charitable deductions, and the trust is not exempt from income tax.

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

 

People.com is reporting that Amber Heard, who received a $7 million settlement in her divorce from Johnny Depp this week, is donating the entire $7 million settlement to charities with “a particular focus to stop violence against women” as well as the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.

In light of this newsworthy charitable donation, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Treasury Green Book Proposals — Charitable Contribution Deduction Limitations

The Department of the Treasury has released the Treasury Green Book  for Fiscal Year 2017, which provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning, if passed, is found on page 252 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

CONSOLIDATE CONTRIBUTION LIMITATIONS FOR CHARITABLE DEDUCTIONS AND EXTEND THE CARRYFORWARD PERIOD FOR EXCESS CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTION DEDUCTION AMOUNTS

Current Law

Current law limits the amount of charitable contribution deductions a donor may claim to a share of the donor’s contribution base (the taxpayer’s AGI computed without regard to any net operating loss carryback for the taxable year). An individual taxpayer may generally deduct up to 50 percent of his or her contribution base for contributions of cash to public charities, and up to 30 percent for cash contributions to

Review of Income Tax Deduction Rules for Charitable Gifts

According to area newspaper the St. Louis Post Dispatch, one of St. Louis’ wealthiest families, that of Enterprise Holdings founder Jack Taylor, is making some very large charitable donations this week–a total of $92.5 million to 13 cultural institutions and charities, most local to St. Louis.

In light of this, we thought now would be a good time to remind everyone of some of the basic income tax deductions available for gifts to charities.

Section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) governs income tax deductions for charitable contributions. In the case of an individual making a cash gift to a Section 501(c)(3) organization classified as a “public charity” (such as churches, schools, hospitals, and governmental units), the gift is deductible for federal income tax purposes so long as the aggregate gifts do not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (“AGI”) for the taxable year.

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