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Treasury Green Book Proposal: 6166 Extensions

459482489The Treasury Green Book provides explanations of the President’s budget proposals.  One such proposal (remember…these are just proposals, not actual changes in the law) that may affect your estate planning is found on page 202 of the Green Book and is re-printed here for your convenience:

EXTEND THE LIEN ON ESTATE TAX DEFERRALS WHERE ESTATE CONSISTS LARGELY OF INTEREST IN CLOSELY HELD BUSINESS

Current Law

Section 6166 allows the deferral of estate tax on certain closely held business interests for up to fourteen years from the (unextended) due date of the estate tax payment (up to fourteen years and nine months from date of death). This provision was enacted to reduce the possibility that the payment of the estate tax liability

Celebrity Family at War Over Estate

Celebrity Family at War Over Estate

February 6, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

The untimely death of Robin Williams shocked and distressed many of his admirers. Now six months after his death many of his admirers are further distressed by the legal battle between Williams’s widow and his children from prior marriages.

Mr. Williams seems to have gone to great lengths to care for and protect his three children from two different marriages. Yet, he also made provisions for his wife. His home in Tiburon, California, along with its contents, subject to certain reservations, was to pass to his wife on his death. However, the trust which, according to news sources, disposes of this home and its contents also provides that his children are to receive his clothing, jewelry and personal photos taken prior to his last marriage as well as his “memorabilia and

Good Faith & Probable Cause Defeat Forfeiture Under No Contest Clause

177855670When a will contains a so-called no contest clause or in terrorem clause that would cause a beneficiary to lose his or her interest in the deceased’s estate in the event the beneficiary contests the validity of the will, the court is often called upon to determine whether to enforce the forfeiture against the beneficiary if he or she loses the will contest. Just such an issue faced the Mississippi Supreme Court in Parker v. Benoist.

In this case, Bronwyn Benoist Parker (“Parker”) filed a will contest, contesting the validity of her father’s 2010 will. The 2010 will changed the disposition of the father’s estate from an equal division between Parker and her brother, William Benoist (“Benoist”), to a disposition where Benoist received a significantly greater portion of their father’s estate and

Casey Kasem: The Countdown (of Estate Planning Lessons) Rolls On

casey-kasem-reuters-208x300More than a month after his death at age 82, Casey Kasem’s body still has not been buried and now is missing from the Washington state funeral home where it was being held, according to a recent statement from the publicist for his daughter, Kerri Kasem.

Kasem’s body disappeared around the same time that Kerri Kasem was granted a temporary restraining order she sought to prevent Casey Kasem’s second wife (and the step mother of three of his four children, including Kerri), Jean Kasem, from cremating Casey’s remains or removing them from cold storage. Kerri was seeking a court order allowing Kerri to obtain an autopsy of her father’s body. Kerri has stated that in light of threats by Jean to sue Kerri for elder abuse and wrongful death she is concerned about how the results of any autopsy that

Bitcoins and Other Hidden Assets

treasuremapYears ago, my grandparents were robbed.  While going through the house and noting the missing items, my grandmother told my mother she was grateful they did not find the family silverware hidden in the attic staircase.  This was the first time my mother had heard of the hiding place and told my grandmother, “I would have sold this house having never found the silverware.”

Nearly everyone has a hiding place for a few special, tangible items, and increasingly many individuals have assets that are not easy to identify or locate.  After the death of the owner of such assets, it can be very difficult for the personal representative of the estate to locate and take possession of all of the decedent’s assets.

Tennessee Requires All Witnesses To A Will To Testify

February 24, 2014

Authored by:

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Originally posted on bryancavefiduciarylitigation.com

When it comes to will execution, sometimes the belt and suspenders approach may be well advised.  But, other times, less is more.  Like, perhaps, when it comes to the number of witnesses.  When state law requires that you only need a set number of witnesses to a will, the Court of Appeals of Tennessee’s opinion in the will contest case of Estate of Woolverton shows us the potential problems that may arise when you bring in extra, unnecessary witnesses.

In Tennessee, the execution of a will requires only two witnesses.  Three witnesses, however, signed the will of Dennis R. Woolverton.  At a hearing on the will contest, only two of the three witnesses and a notary public testified about the signatures on the purported will.  The trial court held that the document was

Planning For the End You Want

Planning For the End You Want

February 10, 2014

Authored by: Steve Dawson and Anne Jump

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Recent news stories such as that of Marlise Muñoz in Texas and auto racing star Michael Schumacher serve as a reminder of the importance of discussing your wishes with others regarding end-of-life care. Select someone you trust to make those decisions on your behalf in case you become incapacitated, and sign the documents required to empower that person to act for you if necessary.

Most Americans say they want to die at home, surrounded by family and friends. But data from Medicare shows only about a third of elderly patients die this way. Taking a few small steps now can go a long way toward ensuring that your wishes are respected when the time comes.

You can start by talking to your family, your friends, and your doctors

Update: Rev. Proc 2014-18s Effect on Same-Sex Married Couples and Portability Elections

Under the portability rules a surviving spouse can elect to have the deceased spouse’s unused estate tax exemption (currently $5.34 Million) added to the surviving spouse’s estate tax exemption amount. But to do this, a federal estate tax return has to be filed within 9 months of the death of the first spouse, even if there is no taxable estate for estate tax purposes. The federal estate tax return is the only way to take advantage of the portability election.  The nine month time limit has proved to be an issue in regards to same-sex spouses, whose marriages were not recognized by the IRS until the Windsor decision on June 26, 2013.  Click here, here, and here to read about the Windsor decision. We believed the Windsor decision may have opened the door to the otherwise “late” portability elections for same-sex spouses, but were not sure how

IRS Issues Revenue Procedure Regarding Portability Election

Yesterday, the IRS released Rev. Proc. 2014-18, which provides a simplified method for certain taxpayers to obtain an extension of time to make a “portability” election, allowing a surviving spouse to apply a deceased spouse’s unused exclusion amount (deceased spousal unused exclusion amount, or DSUE amount)  to the surviving spouse’s subsequent transfers during life or at death.  For more discussions on portability, see our prior posts herehere, here, here and here (can you tell portability has been a hot topic in recent years?)

Under section 2010 (c)(5)(A) of the Code, a portability election must be made on a timely filed Form 706 (Estate Tax Return).  If an executor would not otherwise be required to file an Estate Tax Return, the executor may file for an extension of time under section 301.9100-3 to make the portability election.  In general, such an extension will be granted if the taxpayer establishes that the taxpayer

Estate Planning and Your Pets – Real Life “Aristocats”

Recently, a man who died in Tennessee left his two cats a life interest in his estate. Upon the death of the surviving cat, the remaining estate will pass to the man’s family. Comments on the internet have focused on the cats’ safety, which reminds me of the old Disney move, The Aristocats, where a wealthy old lady leaves her estate to her cats for their lives and the remainder to her butler. After the will is drawn up, the butler tries to dispose of the cats, so he will inherit the estate immediately upon the lady’s death. When her cats expose the butler’s plan, with the aid of several other animals, the lady writes him out of her will and adds the animals that helped save her cats into her will.  You can read more about the Tennessee Aristocats here.

Leaving one’s entire estate to the pets is

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