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Congress Enacts the Corporate Transparency Act Requiring Certain Entities to Disclose their Owners

On January 1, 2021, Congress enacted the National Defense Authorization Act (the NDAA”). One portion of the NDAA includes the Corporate Transparency Act (the “CTA”), which is described as the most comprehensive anti-money laundering legislation passed in the United States and which regulates the use of anonymous entities for money laundering, tax evasion, and financing terrorism.  The CTA requires certain entities, including limited liability companies, corporations, and “similar entities,” to disclose their individual owners and their “beneficial owners”, meaning those who own or control at least 25% of the entity.  The legislation is aimed at preventing these “shell companies” from hiding illegal activity.

The statute states that the CTA only applies to entities that are created by filing a document with a secretary of state or a similar office, or are formed under the laws of a foreign country, but are registered to do business in the United States through

IRS extends more tax deadlines; EO operations affected during COVID-19 and more

Last month, the IRS announced that certain taxpayers generally have until July 15, 2020, to file and pay federal income taxes originally due on April 15. The IRS has extended this relief to additional returns, tax payments and other actions. As a result, the extensions generally now apply to all taxpayers that have a filing or payment deadline falling on or after April 1, 2020, and before July 15, 2020. The extensions apply to many forms and tax payments made by tax-exempt organizations, including:

  • Form 990-series annual information returns or notices (Forms 990, 990-EZ, 990-PF, 990-BL, 990-N (e-postcard))
  • Forms 8871 and 8872
  • Form 5227
  • Form 990-T
  • Form 1120-POL
  • Form 4720
  • Form 8976

See Notice 2020-23 and Rev. Proc. 2018-58 for more information, including a complete list of affected forms, tax payments and other time-sensitive actions.

IRS operations during COVID-19: mission-critical functions continue

In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, the

Income Tax Payment Period Extended, Tax Filing Deadline Is Still April 15th

https://www.google.com/search?q=covid-19&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS762US762&sxsrf=ALeKk02_wIZU5Hcu5kBjZ3TWH-MXOo4S-g:1584709840151&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiWnOCYkKnoAhWWW80KHX1tDVgQ_AUoAnoECA8QBA&biw=1435&bih=650#imgrc=t2x444RPeS4z7M

As a strategy to help combat the economic effects of COVID-19, the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin announced on Monday, March 16th, that taxpayers are getting a 90-day extension for paying their 2019 income taxes.  The goal is to free up $300 billion in liquidity and to lessen the cash-flow burdens facing the country as businesses are temporarily forced to close or slash their workforce.

What does this mean?

While the deadline to file your taxes is still April 15th, 2020, tax payments that are made by July 15th will have no interest or penalty.  As of today, individuals can defer up to $1 Million, while C corporations get an extension up to $10 million.  The $1 million deferral for individuals is to help

THE CHOICE IS NOW YOURS

THE CHOICE IS NOW YOURS

October 6, 2016

Authored by: Kathy Sherby and Charles Lin

Rev. Proc. 2016-49

The recent issuance of Rev. Proc. 2016-49, which modifies and supersedes Rev. Proc. 2001-38, now puts the taxpayer in the driver’s seat. Recall that in Rev. Proc. 2001-38, the Service was providing relief for the surviving spouse when an unnecessary QTIP election was made, by treating such a QTIP election as though it had not been made. Practitioners began to question whether Rev. Proc. 2001-38 would render a QTIP election a nullity when made in order to qualify for a state marital deduction where such an election was not needed to reduce the Federal estate tax liability to zero. Then when portability came into the picture, the enhanced concern about basis adjustment at death drove practitioners to want to make a QTIP election even though not needed to reduce the estate tax liability, to permit the surviving spouse to make larger gifts that would not

WHAT CAN YOUR SPOUSE REACH IN A DIVORCE?

WHAT CAN YOUR SPOUSE REACH IN A DIVORCE?

August 15, 2016

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Edward Peck

 

divorce-jpg

In the recent decision, Pfannenstiehl v. Pfannenstiehl, the Massachusetts Judicial Supreme Court overruled the appeals court decision and concluded that assets held in a discretionary trust created by a third party, where the husband is but one potential beneficiary of the trust, is not a marital asset to be divided on divorce.

Calling Captain Obvious?

Calling Captain Obvious?

November 5, 2015

Authored by: Kathy Sherby and Stephanie Moll

 

ThinkstockPhotos-97430231

With some minor exceptions, the facts are the same in PLR 201525002& PLR 201525003. In these PLRs, the Grantor transferred funds to an irrevocable trust for the Grantor’s own benefit and the benefit of several charities. In each case, the trust was created in a state other than the state of residence of the Grantor. In addition to the Trustee, each trust had an Investment Advisor, a Distribution Advisor, a Charity Distribution Advisor and a Trust Protector, none of whom were trust beneficiaries, except that the Charity Distribution Advisor was the Grantor’s spouse who was a potential appointee.

The Distribution Advisor had the power to direct the Trustee as to whether to make Quarterly Distributions, Support Distributions and Special Contingent Distributions to the Grantor, and also had the power to direct

Will New York State Join the List of Directed Trust States?

Will New York State Join the List of Directed Trust States?

May 26, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

statuteoflibertyThe New York State legislature is considering becoming a directed trust state. In a directed trust, the trustee is allowed to act under the advice or direction of someone else, an advisor or protector, who could make decisions regarding investments, distributions or other trust matters. Earlier this year, the New York State Senate referred a bill to its Judiciary Committee which would expressly allow grantors to establish directed trusts in New York State and sets out general parameters for such trusts.

Settlor’s Residency at Trust Creation Not Sufficient to Subject Trust to Pennsylvania Income Taxation Under Commerce Clause

176961933Another recent court decision has looked at the constitutionality of the State imposing state income tax on an irrevocable trust. Last year, the Court in McNeil v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania held that Pennsylvania’s attempt to tax the McNeil trusts, whose connection to Pennsylvania was (1) the residency of the settlor at the time the trust was created and (2) the residency of the trust’s discretionary beneficiaries was an unconstitutional violation of the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution.

Illinois Income Taxation of Trusts: Minimum Contacts Besides Settlor’s Residency at Trust Creation Required

453118507Last week, we discussed the important issue that settlors, beneficiaries, and trustees of a trust should be thinking about—Do You Know Which States Are Trying to Tax Your Trust?  Two states’ courts have recently looked at what constitutes sufficient minimum contacts to subject a trust to the State’s income tax laws.  In this blog, we will discuss Illinois’ decision in Linn v. Dep’t of Revenue.  Come back next week for our discussion of Pennsylvania’s decision in McNeil v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

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