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Do You Know Which States are Trying to Tax Your Trust?

451594605In an environment in which states are continuously searching for methods of increasing tax revenues, a major consideration for any settlor, beneficiary or trustee of a trust should be where the trust might be subject to income tax. The days of a trust being taxed in the state where it has its “principal place of administration” are quickly fading, as we enter into a new era in which states are increasing attempting to tax trusts with minimal contacts to the jurisdiction.

Trust Was Modified, Not Terminated

February 18, 2014

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Trust Was Modified, Not Terminated

February 18, 2014

Authored by: Luke Lantta

Originally posted on bryancavefiduciarylitigation.com

When a trust instrument sets a time for termination of the trust, it terminates, right?  Well, maybe not.  According to the Kansas Court of Appeals in Lindholm v. Melland (2014 WL 278774) (unpublished), under certain circumstances a trust may continue in existence beyond a termination event.  What happened here to keep the Francis G. Melland Trust going over a decade after it was supposed to terminate?

Francis G. Melland created an irrevocable trust for the benefit of his children, Hugh, Theodore, and Jenny.  Francis’ wife, Sandra, was the original trustee, but she was later replaced by Hugh.  By the terms of the trust instrument, the trust was to terminate when the youngest beneficiary reached the age of 40.  That happened in 2002.  But, in 2002, the trust was neither dissolved nor its assets distributed.  Then, Hugh became the successor trustee in 2005 – three years after the trust

No Liability for Trust Protector in McLean v. Ponder

The Missouri Court of Appeals recently issued an opinion in Robert T. McLean Irrevocable Trust v. Ponder,[1] a case involving the question of whether a Trust Protector could be held liable in not exercising the right to remove and replace the Trustees of a special needs Trust.

The Robert T. McLean Irrevocable Trust (the “Trust”) was created with settlement proceeds from Robert McLean’s (“Robert”) personal injury case.  Ponder was appointed “Trust Protector” of the Trust with the right to remove the Trustee and appoint a successor Trustee.  The Trust Protector was also given the right to appoint a successor Trust Protector and to resign as Trust Protector.  The Trust also provided that the “Trust Protector’s authority was conferred in a fiduciary capacity” and that the Trust Protector was not liable for any actions taken “in good faith.”  The Trust did not provide Ponder with any

Copy Of Will Was Good Enough

Copy Of Will Was Good Enough

November 27, 2013

Authored by: Luke Lantta

Originally posted on bryancavefiduciarylitigation.com

Testators may want to keep careful track of who has copies of their will and where those copies are.  If only a copy of a will – and not the original – is found, it may raise a question about whether the testator destroyed the original in an attempt to revoke it.  Such was the argument made by the caveators in Johnson v. Fitzgerald.  Let’s see why the Georgia Supreme Court felt like a copy was good enough to admit to probate in solemn form.

The executor of an estate offered a copy of a will for probate in solemn form, requesting that it be admitted to probate upon proper proof.  The original could not be found.  The testator’s heirs at law filed a caveat alleging that the will had been revoked by the testator’s destruction of it.

Under Georgia law, if

Conflict Of Interest Warranted Judicial Removal Of Personal Representative And Trustee

Originally posted on bryancavefiduciarylitigation.com

Individual trustees who must administer real property often attempt to save the trust money by personally making certain improvements, repairs, or maintenance to the property.  They then charge the trust for the work they performed.  As the Nebraska Court of Appeals points out in In re Estate of Robb, however, these acts – however well-intentioned – may be self-dealing and can put the trustee in a position of a conflict of interest, which can warrant removal from that fiduciary position.

When Mason D. Robb died, his son, Theodore, became the personal representative of his estate and the trustee of the inter vivos Mason D. Robb Revocable Living Trust.  The trust contained three pieces of real estate.

Under the terms of the trust, the trustee was to hold and use the trust property to pay administrative costs and the debts of the settlor and for the

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