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You won the lottery, now what?

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With up to $1.4 Billion at stake in Wednesday’s Powerball, those who play the lottery are busy making plans for what to do with all the money they may win.  If you win it, you won’t ever have to worry about money again – right?

Wrong.

Calling Captain Obvious?

Calling Captain Obvious?

November 5, 2015

Authored by: Kathy Sherby and Stephanie Moll

 

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With some minor exceptions, the facts are the same in PLR 201525002& PLR 201525003. In these PLRs, the Grantor transferred funds to an irrevocable trust for the Grantor’s own benefit and the benefit of several charities. In each case, the trust was created in a state other than the state of residence of the Grantor. In addition to the Trustee, each trust had an Investment Advisor, a Distribution Advisor, a Charity Distribution Advisor and a Trust Protector, none of whom were trust beneficiaries, except that the Charity Distribution Advisor was the Grantor’s spouse who was a potential appointee.

The Distribution Advisor had the power to direct the Trustee as to whether to make Quarterly Distributions, Support Distributions and Special Contingent Distributions to the Grantor, and also had the power to direct the

WHAT DO YOU MEAN THE TRUST IS NOT ASSET PROTECTED?

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In a recent bankruptcy case, Richard Lewiston unsuccessfully attempted to shelter his assets in the Lois and Richard Lewiston Living Trust (the “Trust”) from inclusion in his bankruptcy estate based on the Trust’s spendthrift provision. Here, the bankruptcy court looked to Michigan state law in applying the provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and concluded the Trust property was part of Lewiston’s bankruptcy estate.

In California, Unambiguous Wills May Now Be Reformed

With drafting assistance from our Washington University School of Law extern, Alexander Fersa.

It seems the California Supreme Court agrees with Cole Porter that “times have changed.”

Abrogating 50 years of binding case law, in In re estate of Duke, the California Supreme Court elected to treat wills the same as trusts are treated under the Uniform Trust Code by allowing courts to look to extrinsic evidence when determining the intent of the testator. The Court concluded that an unambiguous will may be reformed if clear and convincing evidence establishes (1) that the will contains a mistake in the expression of the testator’s intent at the time the will was drafted and (2) the testator’s actual specific intent at the time the will was drafted.

The Court determined that there is no justification for a categorical bar on reformation of unambiguous wills so long as the reformation is supported by

Will New York State Join the List of Directed Trust States?

Will New York State Join the List of Directed Trust States?

May 26, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

statuteoflibertyThe New York State legislature is considering becoming a directed trust state. In a directed trust, the trustee is allowed to act under the advice or direction of someone else, an advisor or protector, who could make decisions regarding investments, distributions or other trust matters. Earlier this year, the New York State Senate referred a bill to its Judiciary Committee which would expressly allow grantors to establish directed trusts in New York State and sets out general parameters for such trusts.

Sometimes, You Might Not Actually Need a Will, and Other Times, You’re Going to Need a Lot More

GTY_whitney_houston_bobbi_kristina_brown_sk_140325_16x9_992It’s true. Even if you don’t have a will, your state has written one for you, and it serves as the default plan for individuals who die without a will (aka “intestate”). Your local Probate Code will have all the juicy details. For the most part, intestacy statutes try to mimic what the average person would have done with their assets if they had a will. For instance, if you’re single and without children, it generally reverts to your parents. If you’re married with minor children, it would generally go to the spouse with whom you had the children, and in some states (like Georgia), a spouse shares with the children. The people who receive your assets under such a statute are generally referred to as your “heirs at law”.

Good Faith & Probable Cause Defeat Forfeiture Under No Contest Clause

177855670When a will contains a so-called no contest clause or in terrorem clause that would cause a beneficiary to lose his or her interest in the deceased’s estate in the event the beneficiary contests the validity of the will, the court is often called upon to determine whether to enforce the forfeiture against the beneficiary if he or she loses the will contest. Just such an issue faced the Mississippi Supreme Court in Parker v. Benoist.

In this case, Bronwyn Benoist Parker (“Parker”) filed a will contest, contesting the validity of her father’s 2010 will. The 2010 will changed the disposition of the father’s estate from an equal division between Parker and her brother, William Benoist (“Benoist”), to a disposition where Benoist received a significantly greater portion of their father’s estate and Parker

A Cautionary Tale: Florida Supreme Court Rules on “Do It Yourself” Will Form

187458483From BryanCaveFiduciaryLitigation.com

Considering creating a do-it-yourself Will to save money?  A recent Florida Supreme Court Case, Aldrich v. Basile, should make you reconsider. 

Young Professionals: Four Practical Estate Planning Steps to Check Off Your List

February 17, 2014

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Many people in their 20s and 30s are more interested in checking off a bucket list than addressing important issues related to estate planning. Young professionals are already quite busy juggling all sorts of concerns – new jobs, new families, new home, adjusting to a new stage of life, but few include estate planning on this list. Despite the popular mantra from Ke$ha to “live like you’re going to die young”, few young adults actually anticipate the possibility of doing so. The following are a few simple steps to enable you to ease the burden on loved ones before life becomes even more complicated.

1. Who do you want to receive your stuff? Put it in writing.

Estate planning does not just involve mass amounts of money – we all have

Planning For the End You Want

Planning For the End You Want

February 10, 2014

Authored by: Steve Dawson and Anne Jump

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Recent news stories such as that of Marlise Muñoz in Texas and auto racing star Michael Schumacher serve as a reminder of the importance of discussing your wishes with others regarding end-of-life care. Select someone you trust to make those decisions on your behalf in case you become incapacitated, and sign the documents required to empower that person to act for you if necessary.

Most Americans say they want to die at home, surrounded by family and friends. But data from Medicare shows only about a third of elderly patients die this way. Taking a few small steps now can go a long way toward ensuring that your wishes are respected when the time comes.

You can start by talking to your family, your friends, and your doctors about

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