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Georgia Conservator’s Final Accounting Approved After Trial

April 18, 2012

Authors

Luke Lantta

Georgia Conservator’s Final Accounting Approved After Trial

April 18, 2012

by: Luke Lantta

Talk to a guardian or conservator and you’ll likely find out it is a thankless, demanding job.  Often these fiduciaries not only have to provide a great deal of care and protection for their wards but also have to be wary of persons eager to bring claims against them for converting the ward’s assets, breaching fiduciary duties, or any number of other possible claims.

Take for example the case of James McQuien.  McQuien began living with Clorina Haring way back in 1974.  In 2001, Haring wasn’t doing so well on account of Alzheimer’s, so McQuien was appointed Haring’s guardian and conservator.  In this role, McQuien hired a sitter for Haring while he was at work and wrote checks to himself and for cash, some of which he used to pay the sitter and the rest of which he used for food and

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Georgia Executor Converted Estate Assets

November 18, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Georgia Executor Converted Estate Assets

November 18, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

In In re Estate of Tapley, the Georgia Court of Appeals took on a number of procedural issues regarding litigation over the Estate of Opal Mae Tapley.

The case highlights a common problem with fiduciary litigation – estate disputes often span multiple courts and involve multiple separate lawsuits.  The case therefore serves as a good reminder to fiduciary litigators that it is their responsibility to follow proper procedure or risk losing a damage award on appeal.

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New Florida Rule Of Appellate Procedure Affects Fiduciary Litigation

November 9, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

New Florida Rule Of Appellate Procedure Affects Fiduciary Litigation

November 9, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

On November 3, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court approved the Appellate Court Rules Committee’s proposed rule changes to the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure.  Among the changes to the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure is the addition of a new Rule 9.170, which governs appeal proceedings in probate and guardianship cases.

Because probate court cases often involve a number of different issues that are akin to a bunch of separate lawsuits all under one probate umbrella, the new rule helps clear up the question of what types of orders are appealable orders.

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Ohio Attorney-In-Fact Abuses Power Of Attorney

October 24, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Ohio Attorney-In-Fact Abuses Power Of Attorney

October 24, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

There are so many ways to abuse powers of attorneys.  That’s why they’ve been referred to as “vehicles for fraud.”  While we’ve previously looked at ways in which they’ve been abused and our colleagues at Bryan Cave, Stephanie Moll and Mary McMath, have examined them in the context of “Who Can You Trust?” over at TrustBryanCave.com, the ways in which they can be abused are seemingly endless.  The reality is that these cases will continue to appear in increasing numbers as the Baby Boomers get older.

Last month, in Ward v. Patrizi, the Ohio Court of Appeals dealt with a a classic power of attorney abuse fact pattern.  A person who needed some help managing his bills designated a family member as his attorney-in-fact.  The attorney-in-fact dutifully paid the principal’s bills from his checking account, but, on the day

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Amendments to Florida Probate Rules

October 14, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Amendments to Florida Probate Rules

October 14, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

In response to several Florida statutory changes that went into effect earlier this year, the Florida Bar’s Probate Rules Committee proposed certain amendments to Probate Rules 5.025 (Adversary Proceedings) and 5.240 (Notice of Administration).  On September 28, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court adopted the Committee’s proposals. 

The Florida Probate Rules have been amended as follows:

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Florida Court Of Appeals Exonerates Trustee Who Sold Trust Property That Was Quickly Flipped For Over Twice The Sales Price

October 3, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Florida Court Of Appeals Exonerates Trustee Who Sold Trust Property That Was Quickly Flipped For Over Twice The Sales Price

October 3, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

When the real estate market was booming, it was common to see trustees take advantage of the soaring sales prices by selling real property that was all or part of a trust corpus to developers or investors.  Real estate investors, of course, are going to try to quickly flip the property for a tidy profit.  It’s no surprise that beneficiaries will look at that type of transaction and think they should have got the benefit of the second sale rather than the original sale.

So what happens when a trustee sells real property held by the trust to an investor who quickly flips the property for more than twice the sale price?  In Ortmann v. Bell, a Florida Court of Appeals considered that scenario and essentially determined that – without more – a transaction like that is not automatically a breach of fiduciary duty.  Of course, it also helps to

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Kansas Executor Loses Real Estate Bequest In Order To Satisfy Liability

September 14, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Kansas Executor Loses Real Estate Bequest In Order To Satisfy Liability

September 14, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

In the event that a corporate fiduciary must repay executor’s fees or trustee’s fees, reimburse an estate or trust the fiduciary’s attorney’s fees, or pay a damages award, it usually has the resources available to make such a payment.  An individual fiduciary, on the other hand, often does not.  An individual fiduciary may bleed the trust or estate dry through litigation and leave nothing behind at its conclusion for the winning party to recover.  Therefore, even if a wronged beneficiary or heir is successful in a lawsuit against an individual fiduciary, the winning party may find him or herself with a piece of paper confirming the victory but not much else.

Fortunately, there are some effective trial techniques available to avoid that scenario – one of which was on display in In re Garibay [2011 WL 3795253 (unpublished)].  On appeal the Kansas Court of Appeals affirmed a trial court’s creative solution to this problem.

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Alaskan Conservator Breached Fiduciary Duties

September 8, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Alaskan Conservator Breached Fiduciary Duties

September 8, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

In Foster v. Professional Guardian Services Corporation, the Alaska Supreme Court determined that a court-appointed conservator breached its fiduciary duties through a number of acts and a failure to timely act.  Even though the conservator prevailed on a majority of the claims brought against it,  and thus prevailed in the “global” scheme of the litigation, the Alaska Supreme Court determined that the conservator could not have its attorney’s fees paid from the ward’s estate for those claims on which it lost.

In reaching its decision, the Alaska Supreme Court suggested that there is no such thing as a de minimis breach of fiduciary duty.

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Liability of Successor Personal Representatives

August 17, 2011

Authors

Luke Lantta

Liability of Successor Personal Representatives

August 17, 2011

by: Luke Lantta

The general rule is that a successor personal representative is not liable for the acts of its predecessor absent certain circumstances (e.g., the successor knew of a breach and permitted it to continue, neglected to take proper steps to redress a breach, etc.).  So, do these certain circumstances arise when the predecessor and successor personal representatives are partners in the same small law firm?  The Wisconsin Court of Appeals recently dealt with that issue and many more in In re Elegreet.

In addition to the successor personal representative liability question, the Court was faced with issues that come up all the time at the trial court level but which don’t often get appellate scrutiny: fees where the executor is also an attorney, attorney’s fees to a successful (or partially successful) beneficiary, and reduction in the personal representative’s fees.  So what led to this tangled web?

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